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dm_s_guide_chapter_1 [2018/06/28 06:57]
triptycho [The Role of the DM]
dm_s_guide_chapter_1 [2019/05/01 10:41] (current)
triptycho [Rules Judgments]
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 ==== Choosing an Adventure ==== ==== Choosing an Adventure ====
  
-In Triptycho, you can either create your own adventure or select a pre-built adventure to run.  A typical adventure runs the course of a single level of play, with the players gaining a level if they are able to reach the end Soa level 1 adventure will feature scenarios designed ​to challenge ​level 1 players, and upon completing the adventure, the players will achieve level 2.  At that point, you can then run a level 2 adventure to keep the game going.+In Triptycho, you can either create your own adventure or select a pre-built adventure to run. Adventures are designed for specific levels ​of play, so choose or create an adventure that matches your players'​ levels (or have your players create characters of the desired ​level)After completing several adventuresplayers advance ​to the next level of playunlocking new abilities ​and facing tougher foes.
  
-It's a good idea to pick a starting level and run a sequence of adventures to tell the complete story of the hero characters the players have created and developed. ​ You may want to make minor modifications to the storyline of subsequent adventures based on what your players have achieved prior, the goals they seek to achieve, and/or presenting the consequences of prior actions. ​ This way, the players have a real hand in guiding what happens within the game's plotline. ​ For many players, that means greater investment in the game and more fun had at the table.+It's a good idea to pick a starting level and run a sequence of adventures to tell the complete story of the hero characters the players have created and developed. You may want to make minor modifications to the storyline of subsequent adventures based on what your players have achieved prior, the goals they seek to achieve, and/or presenting the consequences of prior actions. This way, the players have a real hand in guiding what happens within the game's plotline. For many players, that means greater investment in the game and more fun had at the table.
  
-Another option is to run series ​of "mini-adventures"​ that each resolve much more quickly than a standard adventure These tell shorter stories designed to be completed in just one or two play sessions. ​ If you run these, you may want to string three or four of them together before granting the players a level up so that they have more time each level to experience the results of their deck-building strategies (and to acquire enough [[Wealth|Wealth]] to purchase proper [[Gear|equipment]]) Of course, the rate of advancement ​is entirely up to you, so you're welcome ​to level up faster if you wish, provided you increase the Wealth gains to compensate.+Once you have good bit of experience in the DM position, you may decide to ad-lib your gamesIn these cases, you have very little structure prepared beforehand ​and instead react to what your players are doingThis is a pretty advanced approach, so make sure it's something ​you want to get into before ​you try it.
  
 For new players, it's best to begin at level 1.  In general, the difficulty and complexity of the game increases as levels increase. For new players, it's best to begin at level 1.  In general, the difficulty and complexity of the game increases as levels increase.
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 ==== Playing the NPCs ==== ==== Playing the NPCs ====
  
-As DM, it's your job to play all the non-player characters, or NPCs, in your game.  This includes everything from random people that offer a bit of dialogue to the set of villains and even non-sentient ​challenges ​like traps and bad weather.+As DM, it's your job to play all the non-player characters, or NPCs, in your game. This includes everything from random people that offer a bit of dialogue to the set of villains and even non-sentient ​hazards ​like traps and bad weather.
  
-Side characters that don't get involved in scenarios, such as townsfolk, barkeeps, and travelers that the players have friendly dialogue with, are yours to roleplay as you see fit.  You can use them to provide clues, develop a background for your world, and help tell the story of the adventure. ​ If you're not really into roleplaying,​ you can largely skip this if you wish.+Side characters that don't get involved in scenarios, such as townsfolk, barkeeps, and travelers that the players have friendly dialogue with, are yours to roleplay as you see fit. You can use them to provide clues, develop a background for your world, and help tell the story of the adventure. If you're not really into roleplaying,​ you can largely skip this if you wish.
  
-For the remainder of the NPCs with whom the players have antagonistic interactions,​ you'll play them using representative cards. ​ See the chapter on [[DM's Guide Chapter 3|running scenarios]] for more information.+For the remainder of the NPCs with whom the players have antagonistic interactions,​ you'll play them using representative cards. See the chapter on [[DM's Guide Chapter 3|running scenarios]] for more information.
  
 ==== Rules Judgments ==== ==== Rules Judgments ====
  
-The DM is the referee making final judgment calls regarding how the rules should work at the table. ​ While most rules are quite straightforward with little need for interpretation, ​invariably ​your players will ask to do things that aren't precisely covered by the rules. ​ In this case, it's your job to determine how those actions should interact within the game.+The DM is the referee making final judgment calls regarding how the rules should work at the table. ​ While most rules are quite straightforward with little need for interpretation, ​inevitably ​your players will ask to do things that aren't precisely covered by the rules. ​ In this case, it's your job to determine how those actions should interact within the game.
  
 Because the whole point of playing the game is to have fun, you should take a general approach of allowing player actions that are outside the rules so long as those actions don't impede on the fun of other players at the table. ​ If there are no mechanical consequences to an action (such as within a scenario, or having implications on [[karma|Karma]] or Wealth) it's probably best to just go along with it. Because the whole point of playing the game is to have fun, you should take a general approach of allowing player actions that are outside the rules so long as those actions don't impede on the fun of other players at the table. ​ If there are no mechanical consequences to an action (such as within a scenario, or having implications on [[karma|Karma]] or Wealth) it's probably best to just go along with it.
dm_s_guide_chapter_1.1530194235.txt.gz ยท Last modified: 2018/06/28 06:57 by triptycho